Tag Archives: Ethical Meltdown

Letter to Donald Trump

On March 8, 2016, I sent a letter to Donald Trump.

Dear Mr. Trump

I have been a Republican for well over fifty years. In most Presidential elections I have consistently voted for the Republican candidate. However, in 1960, I voted for John F. Kennedy over Richard Nixon. Why? Because when Nixon ran for his senate seat, his campaign was ethically awful. It turned out that my judgment of Nixon was correct.

This election year, it is likely you will be nominated to be the Republican candidate at the convention this summer.

Based on your performance up to now, I would vote for the Democratic candidate. Again, why? Because your demeanor is awful and your positions on the facts are often incorrect and subject to change on a daily basis.

I have, however, another dilemma. I cannot vote for a socialist whose positions are as bad as Obama’s for the last seven years in office, or for our former Secretary of State, who should be serving a prison term for violating significant federal laws, and whose husband has an ethical history that is worse than Richard Nixon’s.

So here is my advice: First of all, cleanse your mouth and act like a responsible candidate for the American Presidency. Second, hire some outstanding professionals who are conservative thinkers on economics, foreign policy and governance.

You still have time to change your approach for those of us who will reluctantly vote for you, even though at present, you are a default candidate, as opposed to a respected leader of whom we can truly be proud. Ronald Reagan should be your example.

Finally, during your campaign, I suggest you eliminate Chris Christie standing at your side. He is not a solid example of ethical behavior and should not be part of your public team.

Sincerely,

David R. Frazer, Attorney and author of Ethical Meltdown, the Need to Recover Our Vanishing Values.

What is Wrong With This Scenario?

In the March 18th issue of the Wall Street Journal, an article appeared entitled “Law Schools Face Scrutiny on Job Claims.” The essence of the article was that numerous law schools were misrepresenting the percentage of legal jobs available to their graduate students. The higher the percentage of jobs available, the more likely that college applicants will choose a law school with an attractive percentage of law firms or government jobs available.

The reason for the “scrutiny” is because the designated law schools were fudging the figures by providing non-legal jobs paid for by the law school to graduates to increase the percentage without revealing that these temporary jobs were with non-profit companies and others that often expired within a year of graduation. After spending three years and loads of money to become a lawyer, the students deserve honesty from their law schools.

What is wrong with this scenario? As I point out in “Ethical Meltdown,” this type of arrangement violates a rule of ethics known as “Conflict of Interest.” A conflict of interest occurs when there is a situation in which an individual or corporation (or law school) is in a position to exploit a professional or official capacity in some way for personal benefit.

When law schools violate this ethical rule, this should be a wake-up call for the Dean, the professors who teach ethics, and for the Board of Regents, many of whom are probably law graduates from the schools in question.

Birth of a Book

Thursday, October 11, 2012 was a special day. At 1:30 p.m. a Conway Truck pulled up in front of our home in Scottsdale and delivered several cartons of my book “Ethical Meltdown.” Interestingly, the driver’s name was Frazier.

After two years of thinking, outlining and writing this book, I now know how women feel at the birth of their first child. It was truly an exhilarating experience. But now comes the second challenge of marketing the product that looks so appealing with its well-designed cover, and content that will inform and educate my readers.

Most important, I hope you will agree with my solutions to recovering the vanishing values that we once had, thus diminishing the negative influences that have infected our society over the past decades.