Conflicts of Interest of Major Proportions

In my book “Ethical Meltdown,” I wrote about conflicts of interests as a major ethical rule that is so frequently violated that observers must wonder if the violators have ever heard of the rule.

A conflict that is now gaining some publicity involves the Obama Administration and the 11,000 employees on Capital Hill who have been exempted out of a pay provision of the Affordable Care Act that the rest of the country has to pay.

This exemption for members of the House and Senate and their substantial staffs was granted without legal authority, but was happily received by members of both parties. Only one Senator, David Vitter of Louisiana, is attempting to convince other legislators to reverse with legislative action, this crass giveaway to legislators who are already overpaid for what little they are presently producing for the betterment of our country.

This scenario is a clear conflict of interest by Senators and House members who promoted this exemption and equally so for all of the congressmen and women who accepted this windfall, with only one Senator raising an objection.

This conflict of interest by the President and his advisers is granting a financial exemption to a small group of recipients who are in a position to benefit the President’s political agenda.

At the highest level, money and politics again take precedence over principle.